1. juniusworth:

Derek Jeter, as a Yankees prospect in 1994, just after being named Baseball America’s minor-league player of the year.
 “A ballplayer spends a good piece of his life gripping a baseball, and in the end it turns out that it was the other way around all the time.” 
― Jim Bouton, Ball Four
Photo: Mark Lennihan/AP

    juniusworth:

    Derek Jeter, as a Yankees prospect in 1994, just after being named Baseball America’s minor-league player of the year.

     “A ballplayer spends a good piece of his life gripping a baseball, and in the end it turns out that it was the other way around all the time.” 

    ― Jim Bouton, Ball Four
  2. theclassicaldotorg:

The latest issue of The Classical Magazine is nominally The Books Issue, but our writers experienced a bit of that good old American Mission Creep. So you’ll find thoughts about magazine journalism, punk rock, philosophy, occult bike zines, three pieces of fiction (one of which brings together Dwayne Schintzius and Moby-Dick, at last), and more straight-ahead essays on the sports books that moved our contributors, from a classic portrait of gritty ’70s football, to literary novels about soccer managers that strive to reconcile the personal with the ideological. The common thread through it all is, as always, sporps.
We have a great cast of contributors, some Classical vets and some new bylines. The crew this time out is Paul Flannery, Alex Belth, Holly M. Wendt, Nathan Huffstutter, Damon Agnos, Meredith Craig de Pietro, Inman Majors, Bryan Joiner, Chris Collision, and Tobias Carroll.
They’re tackling North Dallas Forty the novel, the making of “What Do You Think of Ted Williams Now?,” doomed love and hockey, Harry Crews, The Pogues, “Waltzing Matilda,” Maurice Clarett, Robert Swift, Matt Bush, John Updike, and more. Do not take my word for the quality of this issue. Buy many copies and then make an informed decision yourself. As always, you can grab our magazine in single servings or subscriptions via our slick iOS app or our also-slick webstore for those who prefer to keep the ghost of Steve Jobs out of their isht. Sorry Steve! It’s all love!

    theclassicaldotorg:

    The latest issue of The Classical Magazine is nominally The Books Issue, but our writers experienced a bit of that good old American Mission Creep. So you’ll find thoughts about magazine journalism, punk rock, philosophy, occult bike zines, three pieces of fiction (one of which brings together Dwayne Schintzius and Moby-Dick, at last), and more straight-ahead essays on the sports books that moved our contributors, from a classic portrait of gritty ’70s football, to literary novels about soccer managers that strive to reconcile the personal with the ideological. The common thread through it all is, as always, sporps.

    We have a great cast of contributors, some Classical vets and some new bylines. The crew this time out is Paul Flannery, Alex Belth, Holly M. Wendt, Nathan Huffstutter, Damon Agnos, Meredith Craig de Pietro, Inman Majors, Bryan Joiner, Chris Collision, and Tobias Carroll.

    They’re tackling North Dallas Forty the novel, the making of “What Do You Think of Ted Williams Now?,” doomed love and hockey, Harry Crews, The Pogues, “Waltzing Matilda,” Maurice Clarett, Robert Swift, Matt Bush, John Updike, and more. Do not take my word for the quality of this issue. Buy many copies and then make an informed decision yourself. As always, you can grab our magazine in single servings or subscriptions via our slick iOS app or our also-slick webstore for those who prefer to keep the ghost of Steve Jobs out of their isht. Sorry Steve! It’s all love!

  3. Three unidentified Cuban boys playing baseball in Cuba: one pitching, one catching, and one at bat.
Ernest Hemingway Collection. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston.

    Three unidentified Cuban boys playing baseball in Cuba: one pitching, one catching, and one at bat.

    Ernest Hemingway Collection. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston.

  4. summeranne:

Baseball photo by my dad, early ’80s.

    summeranne:

    Baseball photo by my dad, early ’80s.

  5. Big Puma.

from Alyson Footer’s great, odd post on Puma Being Puma.

    Big Puma.

    from Alyson Footer’s great, odd post on Puma Being Puma.

  6. When originally published in 1913, Christy Mathewson took a co-author credit for “The Girl and the Pennant.” It was staged on Broadway, lasting 20 shows. The play was also novelized and syndicated in newspapers. It threatened to “dramatize the human interest side of baseball with several exciting incidents from Mathewson‟s actual experience.” Unclear on how successfully.

    When originally published in 1913, Christy Mathewson took a co-author credit for “The Girl and the Pennant.” It was staged on Broadway, lasting 20 shows. The play was also novelized and syndicated in newspapers. It threatened to “dramatize the human interest side of baseball with several exciting incidents from Mathewson‟s actual experience.” Unclear on how successfully.

  7. frozenrope:


While playing baseball for Wright State University, Guided by Voices frontman Robert Pollard threw a no-hitter.

(via)
  8. On Lance

    "[Rice University Baseball Head Coach Wayne] Graham recalled a game Rice played at TCU, where there was a hole at the base of the right-field fence. Berkman once reached through the hole to retrieve a ball and found it had a plastic bag wrapped around it. He took the ball out of the bag, let the bag float into the air, then threw the ball back into the bag.”

    - via the Houston Chronicle

  9. This is a different sport but I don’t care. Friend of P&P Patrick Truby rules it with this animation. I want him to animate Hunter Pence highlights and everything else so bad. - ted

    patruby:

    image

    my favorite NBA play ever [dot] gif

  10. juniusworth:

Ted Williams during the Boston Red Sox’s spring training visit to Cuba’s La Tropical Stadium.
1946
cubabeisbol

    juniusworth:

    Ted Williams during the Boston Red Sox’s spring training visit to Cuba’s La Tropical Stadium.

    1946

    cubabeisbol

    (Source: thenationalpastimemuseum.com)